COSEWIC Wildlife Species Assessments (detailed version), November 2014*

Results are grouped by taxon and then by status category. The range of occurrence in Canada (by province, territory or ocean) and history of status designation are provided for each wildlife species.

Mammals

Beluga Whale Delphinapterus leucas Endangered
     St. Lawrence Estuary population
Assessment Criteria   A2abce+4abce; C2a(ii)
Reason for Designation
This population, endemic to Canada, is at the southernmost limit of the species’ distribution, and reproductively and geographically isolated from other populations. This population of a long-lived, slowly reproducing species was severely reduced by hunting, which continued until 1979. Since population monitoring surveys began in the 1980s, the total population size has remained at around 1000 individuals -- less than 20% of the population size in the late 1800s or early 1900s. The major threats currently affecting this population include pathogens, toxic algal blooms, pollution, noise disturbance and other human intrusions and disturbance.  The impacts of these threats are likely amplified by the low number of mature individuals remaining in the population.  Since the mid-2000s, the population has shown evidence of major demographic changes including increased neonate mortality and a decline in the proportion of young individuals in the population. These trends, together with past and ongoing habitat degradation, and projected increases in threats, suggest that the status of this population has worsened and is at considerably greater risk than when it was previously assessed by COSEWIC in 2004.
Range   QC Atlantic Ocean
Status History
Designated Endangered in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
Caribou Rangifer tarandus Endangered
     Atlantic-Gaspésie population
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii,v); C2a(i); D1; E
Reason for Designation
This small isolated population has declined to fewer than 120 adults. Historically, these caribou were much more widely spread, occurring in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. Today, they mainly use alpine habitats on mountain plateaus in the Gaspésie region, in Quebec. Habitat has been modified by resource development, including forest management that reduced forest age, and increased density of predators of caribou. Adult mortality and continued low calf recruitment due to Eastern Coyote and Black Bear predation are contributing to an ongoing decline. Population models predict the population may become extinct by 2056.
Range   QC
Status History
Atlantic-Gaspésie population designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000.Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002 and November 2014.
 
Townsend's Mole Scapanus townsendii Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)
Reason for Designation
This species is the largest mole in North America, and in Canada is found in just a 50 km2 area in the Fraser Valley of southwestern British Columbia. This species is restricted to certain soil types, and its limited dispersal abilities make it highly vulnerable to habitat fragmentation. Threats to the population include agricultural practices and trapping by pest control agents and by property owners. The habitat has been degraded through fragmentation, conversion from pasture land to berry farms, and urbanization.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Threatened in April 1996. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2003 and November 2014.
 
Caribou Rangifer tarandus Threatened
     Boreal population
Assessment Criteria   A3bc+4abc
Reason for Designation
This population occurs at naturally low densities in mature boreal forest habitats from Labrador to Yukon, with small, isolated populations at the southern part of the range, including along the Lake Superior coastline and in the Charlevoix region of Québec. Over the past century, local subpopulations have been lost; range contraction has proceeded from the south by up to 50% of historical range in some areas. Despite considerable conservation efforts, range-wide declines have continued since the last assessment in 2002, particularly in Alberta, northeastern British Columbia, and Labrador. Some populations remain poorly monitored, particularly those in the northern portion of the range. For 37 of 51 subpopulations where trend data are available, 81% are in decline, as indicated by negative population growth rates. Some of the most intensively managed subpopulations may remain critically imperiled. Reasons for decline are mainly due to increased predation and habitat loss, the latter stemming from the combination of anthropogenic (natural resource extraction) and natural (fires) disturbance. The proliferation of linear landscape features such as roads and seismic lines facilitates predation by wolves, and the conversion of mature – old conifer stands to younger seral stages promotes increases in alternate prey such as Moose and White-tailed Deer. Shifts in the northern distribution of White-tailed Deer, mediated by landscape change, also bring novel parasites into parts of the range of this population. In some regions, overhunting poses a threat to long-term conservation. Threats are closely interrelated and act cumulatively to impact this population. Population increases do not appear likely in one-third of subpopulations where disturbances exceed a threshold of viability. A >30% decline in population is projected in the near term.
Range   YT NT BC AB SK MB ON QC NL
Status History
The Boreal population was designated Threatened in May 2000. This newly-defined population is comprised of a portion of the de-activated "Western population" and all of the de-activated "Labrador-Ungava population". Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002 and November 2014.
 
Caribou Rangifer tarandus Special Concern
     Newfoundland population
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This population was last assessed as Not at Risk in 2002 when the population was 85,000. This population has fluctuated in abundance over the last 100 years and presently has declined by approximately 60% over the last 3 caribou generations. The decline was due to limited forage when the population was at high density, harvest, and predation. Various indices suggest that the population is improving but there is concern that Eastern Coyote, which has recently arrived to Newfoundland, may become a significant predator and influence recruitment such that the population continues to decline.
Range   NL
Status History
Newfoundland population was designated Not at Risk in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000 and in May 2002. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in November 2014.
 
Spotted Bat Euderma maculatum Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This distinctly patterned bat is found in the dry intermontane grasslands of southern British Columbia.  A cliff-roosting bat, its patchy distribution and specialized roosting needs suggest a relatively small population size.  The main threats to foraging habitat in valley bottoms or roosting locations are urban development, land conversion for orchards and vineyards, roads, mining and exploration, recreational activities (e.g., rock climbing), and light and noise pollution. This bat may be susceptible to White-nose Syndrome if this disease spreads west. Its specialized habitat requirements and slow reproductive rate will affect recovery.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004 and November 2014.
 

Birds

Ancient Murrelet Synthliboramphus antiquus Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
Approximately half of the global breeding population of this burrow-nesting seabird occurs on Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Recent survey information for the species is limited and the overall population trend is unknown. There is, however, evidence of declines at some breeding colonies on the west coast of Haida Gwaii, although populations may be increasing at some colonies on the east coast.  The species is exposed to a number of threats including predation from introduced predators, habitat degradation, exposure to oil and oceanographic changes. The species may become Threatened if these threats are not appropriately managed.
Range   BC Pacific Ocean
Status History
Designated Special Concern in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2004 and November 2014.
 
Cassin's Auklet Ptychoramphus aleuticus Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
About 75% of the world population of this ground-nesting seabird occurs in British Columbia. Overall, the Canadian population is thought to be declining, but population monitoring has been insufficient to determine size and trends. The species faces threats from mammalian predators that have been introduced to its breeding islands. While predators have been removed from some breeding colonies, it is likely that ongoing predator management is going to be needed to maintain the species. The species also faces other threats when it forages at sea, including large-scale climate change effects on its oceanic prey, and risks from oiling.
Range   BC Pacific Ocean
Status History
Designated Special Concern in November 2014.
 
Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This bird has declined over the last 40 years in an important staging area; however, overall population trends during the last three generations are unknown. The species faces potential threats on its breeding grounds including habitat degradation associated with climate change. It is also susceptible to pollutants and oil exposure on migration and during the winter. This is because birds gather in large numbers on the ocean, especially where currents concentrate pollutants.
Range   YT NT NU BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL Pacific Ocean Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean
Status History
Designated Special Concern in November 2014.
 

Reptiles

Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina Extirpated
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This turtle occurred historically in Ontario based on archeological evidence and Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge. Habitat modification has been extensive and the species is no longer extant. Considerable search effort has documented fewer than 10 individuals in Ontario, but these individuals all represent released captive individuals from unknown sources and are not considered part of the former Canadian population.
Range   ON
Status History
Species considered in May 2002 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Status re-examined and designated Extirpated in November 2014.
 
Spotted Turtle Clemmys guttata Endangered
Assessment Criteria   C1
Reason for Designation
This species has an unusually low reproductive potential, including late age at maturity and low fecundity, and occurs in small, isolated subpopulations. Although some subpopulations are in protected areas, there is evidence from extensive monitoring and projected calculated declines that even these populations are in jeopardy despite low exposure to anthropogenic threats. The main threats to the species are road mortality; collection for the pet, food and traditional medicine trade; and habitat loss due to invasive plants and development. There is no potential for rescue from outside populations.
Range   ON QC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004 and November 2014.
 
Western Skink Plestiodon skiltonianus Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
The Canadian distribution of the species is within a densely populated region of the Southern Interior of British Columbia that is undergoing extensive development. Increased survey efforts within the past 10 years have resulted in the discovery of the species at new localities within the known range. Nevertheless, the range remains small and human activities and land use practices continue to threaten skink habitats.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in May 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 

Fishes

Grass Pickerel Esox americanus vermiculatus Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This fish is known from relatively few locations from southern Lake Huron to western Québec. The subspecies has a scattered distribution in Canada and is not abundant in any area. The subspecies could become threatened if habitat quality continues to decline owing to changes in land use and invasive species.
Range   ON QC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in May 2005. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 
Spotted Sucker Minytrema melanops Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This species is a relatively rare fish that inhabits lakes and rivers in southwestern Ontario. Its spatial distribution has remained relatively constant in these environments but there are indications that occurrence has declined in the Lake Erie part of its range. Specific threats are poorly understood, but the species is likely sensitive to high turbidity, which is common in the degraded environments it inhabits. The species may become Threatened if factors suspected of negatively influencing its persistence are neither reversed nor managed effectively.
Range   ON
Status History
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1994, November 2001, May 2005, and November 2014.
 

Arthropods

Poweshiek Skipperling Oarisma poweshiek Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii); C2a(i)
Reason for Designation
The Canadian population is isolated and disjunct from the populations in United States which are 1000 km to the south.  Widespread declines within the past decade on both sides of the border mean Canada holds a significant portion of the species global range. Within Canada this species is restricted to native tall-grass prairie, a habitat that has also undergone similar declines. Although most of the occupied habitat is protected, even with appropriate management, its range is so small that the butterfly is increasingly vulnerable to stochastic events.
Range   MB
Status History
Designated Threatened in November 2003. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
White Flower Moth Schinia bimatris Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)
Reason for Designation
In Canada, this moth is restricted to dunes at one site within the Bald Head Hills of southern Manitoba, which is 1000 km north of the nearest site in the United States. The moth’s habitat is threatened from natural native vegetation succession into the otherwise open and sparsely vegetated sand. Larval host plants are unknown; however they are suspected to be in the Aster family.  The ongoing vegetation encroachment competes with larval host plant quantity and quality.
Range   MB
Status History
Designated Endangered in May 2005. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 
Sable Island Sweat Bee Lasioglossum sablense Threatened
Assessment Criteria   D2
Reason for Designation
This species is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia, and occurs as one isolated population with a very small range and no possibility of rescue.  The island has only about 13 km2 of vegetated area that provides forage/nesting sites for this bee.  Nesting likely occurs near or within this vegetated area and sweat bees are not known to travel large distances (i.e. > 200 m) for forage. Increased frequency and severity of storms, in addition to climate change and related sea level rise, are expected to drive change which will further decrease the quality and quantity of bee habitat on the island. Eco-tourism is also a potential future threat, which may also increase the introduction and spread of invasive species. Habitat on the island is also susceptible to invasive plant species, introduced horses, and seawater flooding. 
Range   NS
Status History
Designated Threatened in November 2014.
 

Molluscs

Broad-banded Forestsnail Allogona profunda Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v)
Reason for Designation
In Canada, this large terrestrial snail is known to exist only in Point Pelee National Park and on Pelee Island. An overabundance of nesting Double-crested Cormorants has most likely led to the loss of subpopulations on some small Lake Erie islands since the early 1980s; historical losses of woodlands and forests also occurred on the mainland and Pelee Island. Major continuing threats are from recreational activities and shoreline erosion. A possible threat is predation by introduced Wild Turkeys, which are rapidly increasing in numbers.
Range   ON
Status History
Designated Endangered in November 2014.
 

Vascular Plants

Fascicled Ironweed Vernonia fasciculata Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv)
Reason for Designation
This showy perennial plant has a restricted geographical range in Canada, and occupies small prairie remnants mainly along roadside ditches and riversides in southern Manitoba. The few small subpopulations are at risk from impacts such as alteration of flood duration and frequency, herbicide use, and road and right-of-way maintenance activities.
Range   MB
Status History
Designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
Limber Pine Pinus flexilis Endangered
Assessment Criteria   A3e+4ae
Reason for Designation
This tree species is imminently and severely threatened throughout its Canadian range by White Pine Blister Rust (an introduced pathogen), Mountain Pine Beetle, and climate change. Surveys at a number of sites in 2009 document an average of 43% and 35% of infected or dead trees, respectively. Repeated survey information leads to an estimated decline in the Canadian population of about 1% per year. At that rate, close to 2/3 of mature individuals are expected to be lost over the next 100 years, and local subpopulations could become extirpated.
Range   BC AB
Status History
Designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
Phantom Orchid Cephalanthera austiniae Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(ii,iii,iv,v); C2a(i)
Reason for Designation
This parasitic orchid occurs in very low numbers at scattered locations in southwestern British Columbia. Losses of some subpopulations, along with continuing habitat fragmentation and declines in habitat quality through new housing development and recreational activities, make future losses of subpopulations likely. The species' dependency on specific habitat conditions and its inter-dependency on a fungal partner and associated tree species make it more susceptible to extirpation.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2000. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
Red Mulberry Morus rubra Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v); C2a(i); D1
Reason for Designation
This small to medium-sized tree from Carolinian forests of southern Ontario has declined in numbers of mature individuals and subpopulations since the last COSEWIC assessment in 2000. Only 217 total individuals are known to occur in Canada, and only 105 of these are considered of reproductive age. Only four subpopulations have more than five reproductive individuals. The greatest threat to the species is hybridization with the non-native White Mulberry. Effects of twig canker diseases also contribute to declines. At two sites, nesting by Double-crested Cormorants poses a significant threat.
Range   ON
Status History
Designated Threatened in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000 and November 2014.
 
Tall Beakrush Rhynchospora macrostachya Endangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii); C2a(ii)
Reason for Designation
In Canada, this perennial sedge only occurs along two acidic, peaty lakeshores in southwestern Nova Scotia, where it is disjunct from its main U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain distribution. Its small population size (ca 700 individuals total in two subpopulations) and very specific habitat needs make it vulnerable to lakeshore development, water regulation (for hydroelectric power), and shading and competition from introduced invasive plants such as Glossy Buckthorn, which benefit from increased concentrations of nutrients in these two lakes.
Range   NS
Status History
Designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
Toothcup Rotala ramosior Endangered
     Southern Mountain population
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)
Reason for Designation
This annual plant is known from just two local populations in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Some locations have been lost as a result of shoreline development; at present, this species is limited by the availability of suitable seasonally wet sites, and threatened by invasive exotic plant species.
Range   BC
Status History
The species was considered a single unit and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Split into two populations in November 2014. The Southern Mountain population was designated Endangered in November 2014.
 
Blue Ash Fraxinus quadrangulata Threatened
Assessment Criteria   C2a(i)
Reason for Designation
This tree has a restricted distribution in the Carolinian forests of southwestern Ontario. Small total population size in a fragmented landscape, combined with increasing potential impact from browsing by White-tailed Deer and infestation by the invasive Emerald Ash Borer, place the species at risk of further declines at most sites. In addition, mature trees on Middle Island are threatened by impacts of nesting Double-crested Cormorants. These factors resulted in a change in status from Special Concern to Threatened.
Range   ON
Status History
Designated Threatened in April 1983. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in November 2000. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2014.
 
Griscom’s Arnica Arnica griscomii ssp. griscomii Threatened
Assessment Criteria   B2ab(ii,iii,iv)
Reason for Designation
This mat-forming plant is a Canadian Gulf of St. Lawrence endemic found only on small, isolated calcareous cliffs and limestone barrens of Quebec and the Island of Newfoundland, is increasingly under threat due to habitat shift in response to a changing climate. The instability of some sites increases the threat of a stochastic event that could result in the loss of some small subpopulations. ATV use in limestone barrens is of some concern.
Range   QC NL
Status History
Designated Threatened in November 2014.
 
Small White Lady's-slipper Cypripedium candidum Threatened
Assessment Criteria   Does not clearly meet criteria, but designated Threatened because of small IAO, documented losses of subpopulations, declines in habitat quality, and life history characteristics.
Reason for Designation
This orchid is known in Canada from Manitoba and Ontario where it grows mainly in tallgrass and mixed grass prairies. These sites require management to prevent encroachment of woody vegetation and to remain suitable for the orchid. Increased search effort has uncovered previously unknown populations in Manitoba, but many populations are small, and some have been lost in recent years. The discovery of additional populations, increased habitat protection, and active management for this species resulted in a change in status from Endangered to Threatened. Because individuals are slow to mature and require a fungal partner, the species is especially vulnerable to local extirpations. In addition to encroachment, the species is threatened by invasive plant species, alteration of hydrology, residential and commercial development, roadside maintenance and illegal collecting.
Range   MB ON
Status History
Designated Endangered in April 1981. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2000. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2014.
 
Toothcup Rotala ramosior Threatened
     Great Lakes Plains population
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)
Reason for Designation
This annual plant is known from the shores of only two lakes at the southern edge of the Canadian Shield in southeastern Ontario. Year-to-year fluctuations in water levels along the lakeshore impact the abundance of plants. Impacts from development, recreational boating activities, and manipulation of water levels have the potential to reduce the number of individuals.
Range   ON
Status History
The species was considered a single unit and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Split into two populations in November 2014. The Great Lakes Plains population was designated Threatened in November 2014.
 
Yukon Podistera Podistera yukonensis Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This long-lived plant, almost entirely restricted to Canada, is at risk due to projected loss of its alpine habitat as a result of rapidly changing climate. In addition, mining and mineral exploration is occurring at or near several locations.
Range   YT
Status History
Designated Special Concern in November 2014.
 

Mosses

Columbian Carpet Moss Bryoerythrophyllum columbianum Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This is a small, perennial moss that is endemic to western North America. In Canada, it has a restricted distribution in the shrub-steppe of the semi-arid Southern Interior of British Columbia. Surveys have confirmed its presence from 22 sites. The species is never abundant where it is found and recent surveys have provided few new locations. The species is patchily distributed at low densities. At least one population is believed to have been lost to vineyard development. Threats include agriculture, forest encroachment as a result of fire suppression, impact by grazing animals, urban development, road improvements, and recreational impacts.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in May 2004. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 
Tiny Tassel Crossidium seriatum Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This very small moss has a very narrow range in Western Canada. It occurs only in the semiarid shrub steppe of four valleys in the Okanagan region of southernmost central British Columbia. Surveys have confirmed this species from only 20 sites on steep slopes associated with calcareous glacial lake deposits. Threats include erosion due to recreational use of the habitat, and maintenance of road cuts. Climate change may also be a threat, although the potential impacts are unknown. One site has been extirpated due to habitat conversion.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in November 2014.
 
Twisted Oak Moss Syntrichia laevipila Special Concern
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This moss occurs from British Columbia and Washington southward to California. The Canadian populations, which are at the northern limits of the species’ range in western North America, occur only in the area of southeastern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands. The species is known from more than 90 sites where it is largely restricted to the bark of trees, especially Garry Oak. This species is never dominant where it grows, nor is it frequent in large oak stands. The major threat to the species is the removal of mature Garry Oak. Without land management practices that build and preserve Garry Oak populations, this threat would result in the extirpation of most populations of this species.
Range   BC
Status History
Designated Special Concern in May 2004. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 

Lichens

Boreal Felt Lichen Erioderma pedicellatum Endangered
     Atlantic population
Assessment Criteria   C1+2a(i)
Reason for Designation
This species is believed to be extirpated from New Brunswick, and the remaining population in Nova Scotia is small. Intensive monitoring efforts over the past ten years indicate that both the number of occurrences and number of individuals are declining. These declines are projected to continue in the future. The main threats include habitat loss and deterioration as a result of forest harvesting, air pollution, climate change, and predation by introduced slugs.
Range   NB NS
Status History
Designated Endangered in May 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 
Boreal Felt Lichen Erioderma pedicellatum Special Concern
     Boreal population
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This species is widely distributed in Newfoundland and several threats to its survival have been identified including habitat alteration due to invasive species, acid rain and extreme weather events. Despite declines in some areas, new populations continue to be found.  More research and monitoring are needed to understand population trends, so on the basis of the precautionary principle, the species is of Special Concern.
Range   NL
Status History
Designated Special Concern in May 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 
Frosted Glass-whiskers Sclerophora peronella Special Concern
     Atlantic population
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This tiny stubble lichen is rare over much of its global range; in Canada, thirteen occurrences are in Nova Scotia. The lichen is known only from the exposed heartwood of old red maple trees in wetlands or uplands. The main threat is the loss of habitat and tree removal associated with increased harvesting of upland and ‘low grade’ wetland hardwoods for biomass energy generation, firewood and other products. A second threat is the blow-down of old maple trees by an increasing number of extreme weather events related to climate change.
Range   NS
Status History
Designated Special Concern in May 2005. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 
Frosted Glass-whiskers Sclerophora peronella Data Deficient
     Pacific population
Assessment Criteria   not applicable
Reason for Designation
This tiny stubble lichen has only been found at two sites in British Columbia. One in the Skeena River Basin was not found again when the site was revisited. An additional occurrence was recorded subsequently near Albert River, British Columbia, just south of Kootenay National Park. Considerable search effort since has not revealed more sites for this lichen in British Columbia. The exact ecological niche occupied by the Pacific population of this lichen is not understood.
Range   BC
Status History
Species considered in May 2005 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2014.
 

*The assessment of Flooded Jellyskin (Leptogium rivulare) was deferred.



28/11/2014